Travel

Corregidor Island Part 2

*P.S. Another heavy photo post under the cut*

Hello there! Here’s part 2 of my Corregidor Island travelogue. Our next stop was the Middleside Barracks –  a large military barracks made up of two three-story buildings which was referred to as the Middleside Barracks because it was constructed in the middle side sector of the island.

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Personnel of the 60th Coast Artillery Regiment and the 91st Philippine Scout Coast Artillery Regiment were billeted in this barracks. It was also briefly occupied by elements of the 4th Marine Regiment upon their arrival in Corregidor on December 1941.

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P.S. The old people got tired whilst the younger ones were very hyper taling photos that time. Lol

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Right after the Middle Side Barracks we then proceeded to the Battery Way – is a battery of four 12-inch mortars located on the island of Corregidor. Battery Way was one of two (Battery Geary the other) mortar batteries at Fort Mills that, with Fort Hughes, Fort Drum, Fort Frank and Fort Wintformed the Harbor Defenses of Manila and Subic Bays. Battery Way was named for Lt. Henry N Way of the 4th U.S. Artillery.

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Battery Way was constructed as part of the fortifications program initiated by the Taft Board. Constructed between 1908 and 1914, it was the only single-pit mortar battery built as part of the program. Its four coast defense mortars, M1890MI guns on M1896MI carriages, were designed to loft armor-piercing shells in a high trajectory onto the decks of warships threatening Manila Bay. Advances in naval gunnery and ship design rendered these weapons mostly obsolete by the end of World War I. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Obligatory picture with the big Mortar! This was suppose to be a test shot but it turned out great so why not post? 🙂

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And another picture featuring Mommy Queen Bee.

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Next stop is, The Spanish Light house –  At its current site, the original lighthouse was built by the Spaniards in 1836. Sixty-one years later a need for a much bigger lighthouse was conceived which led to the erection of another structure to replace the old one. However, the lighthouse was destroyed during World War II.

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The current lighthouse was constructed on the same site at an elevation of 628 feet above sea level. Being the highest point in the island, visitors who climb up the stairs of the lighthouse can have a breathtaking view of Corregidor, Manila Bay, the South China Sea, and the neighboring provinces of Bataan and Cavite (Obviously I didn’t even bother to try because of my fear of heights). Beside the lighthouse is a small gift shop where visitors can buy souvenirs.

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We have reached the tail of the Island!

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Here’s a View of the Tails End, it is the remaining portion of Corregidors long and twisting tail which was not given a particular name. The western half of this narrow, two-and-a-half mile area consists of a low ridge with several distinct hills which is said to have assumed crucial military importance during the siege of Corregidor in 1942 by the Japanese forces and also during its recapture by the American forces in 1945. A portion of the eastern end of the tail, being a fairly level terrain, was leveled off for the construction of the island’s only airstrip which was named Kindley Field. East Point, at the island’s extreme tail, contained a small cemetery. Just a little further beyond it is Hooker Point which is often separated from East Point during high tide. In the early years of the presence of American forces in Corregidor, Hooker Point was a favorite place for hikers and sightseers. Among the recently constructed buildings, structures, and parks that are now found at the Tail End include the following: Statue of The Filipino Woman, Filipino Heroes Memorial, Japanese Garden of Peace, the two parks which were erected in honor of Presidents Manuel Quezon and Sergio Osmena, and the Corregidor Beach Resort. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Remember The Malinta Tunnel from my previous post? Look how far i’ved reached and how big the tunnel is. Amazing isn’t it?

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After all the mini trips we had around the Island. It’s time for us us to cool down and see the miniatures, history and the like of the Island. So we entered the Pacific War Memorial Displays.

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Here’s what the Island looks. A tadpole like.

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Our last stop was the Battery Geary, Defiladed in a hollow on Corregidors Southern coast, Battery Geary had two mortar pits, with three  magazines, one at each side and one between the two pits.

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Armament was eight 12-inch [305mm] Mortars, four M1890  M1 on M1896M1 carriages in Pit A and four M1890 on M1908 carriages in Pit B. These could fire a 1000lb [4554.5 Kg]  deck piercing shell 700 lb [318Kg] High Explosive shell 8.3 miles [13.35 Km] in any direction. Maximum bagged charged weight was 63 lb [28.6Kg]. Minimum firing elevation was 45 degrees and maximum elevation was 70 degrees [M1890] or 65 degrees [M1908].

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The vertical plunging trajectory of these mortars made them ideal against enemy entrenchments on the higher ground in Bataan.  Maximum rate of fire was one round each 45 seconds, though this was for crews at the peak of physical perfection. Each mortar required a four man crew. (Source: Wikipedia)

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Aren’t you in love with the blue & green surroundings? The place was just free from tranquility. Away from the urban city. So, after our last stop we headed back to the dock to catch our ferry boat. Sadly, my Phone and Cameras battery are too drained to function hence limited photos. But I did not regret that ‘cause I get to capture some landscape views of the Island during 4:00PM.

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And yes. We chased the sunset! I think I have a photo in my instagram account of the sunset while riding the ferry boat.

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Corregidor, you are simply amazing!

* I totally recommend people to come here, not only because it has beautiful sceneries but because we get to experience and know the history of the Philippines that has occurred in this specific Island. We are very lucky that the government has maintained the wellness of the Island. Knowing more about the Philippines history makes me want to travel more and explore the world more! Here I come Philippines 🙂

PART 1 OF CORREGIDOR ISLAND TRAVELOGUE

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